Author Topic: Short or Long Shaft Outboard?  (Read 5589 times)

Rob McLelland

  • Inactive
  • U20 Virgin
  • *
  • Posts: 5
  • #179
Short or Long Shaft Outboard?
« on: April 06, 2010, 07:54:32 PM »
Hello all:

I'm getting ready to buy a motor for my boat and I'm wondering: are most people using short or long shaft motors?  Measuring height over the transom (14") leads me to believe a short shaft is fine in anything but REALLY choppy water, and I'm really only planning on using this thing to get me off and on the ramp, and maybe home when the wind dies (which generally means fairly flat water.)  Short would be easier to handle, too.  But those Hondas don't come cheap, and I'd like to get this right.  Thanks for any opinions you can provide.

Rob
#179
« Last Edit: April 06, 2010, 08:26:41 PM by Rob McLelland »

Billy Ellis

  • #99
  • Active Member
  • U20 Enthusiast
  • **
  • Posts: 160
Re: Short or Long Shaft Outboard?
« Reply #1 on: April 06, 2010, 09:06:24 PM »
Rob, you should be fine with a short shaft. If you plan to race I'd look for a used 2.5hp or 3.5hp two stroke. For years one company out of Japan made them and everybody put their lable on them so make is not relevant. They are reliable and weigh next to nothing. I think the 3.5 had a forward/neutral transmission and it was very light as well. The four strokes are nice but heavy.
http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/Mercury-2-5-HP-Outboard-Boat-Motor_W0QQcmdZViewItemQQhashZitem2306585b37QQitemZ150430309175QQptZBoatQ5fPartsQ5fAccessoriesQ5fGear

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/1996-Evinrude-2-0-2HP-Outboard-Motor-NEW-IN-FACTORY-BOX_W0QQcmdZViewItemQQhashZitem3cabb20d60QQitemZ260578610528QQptZBoatQ5fPartsQ5fAccessoriesQ5fGear

This is the modal I have:
http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/JOHNSON-MODEL-3-5-H-P-OUTBOARD-2-STROKE-BOAT-MOTOR_W0QQcmdZViewItemQQhashZitem563b0ba2f5QQitemZ370357805813QQptZBoatQ5fPartsQ5fAccessoriesQ5fGear
« Last Edit: April 06, 2010, 09:32:00 PM by Billy Ellis »

Mark Allen

  • #26 JUNTA
  • Active Member
  • U20 Enthusiast
  • **
  • Posts: 175
Re: Short or Long Shaft Outboard?
« Reply #2 on: April 06, 2010, 09:43:08 PM »
Rob,
  You are right. A short shaft is just fine in everything except a nice chop. I have an older 2hp 2 stroke Tohatsu short shaft nicknamed "Pepe". He has two speeds, On and Off. No frills. I think it weighs about 30#'s so no penalty carrying the motor.  Just have to deal with the gas  ;D

Mark
Duck or Die!

Denise Hammond

  • #155 Babe
  • Active Member
  • U20 Youngster
  • **
  • Posts: 26
Re: Short or Long Shaft Outboard?
« Reply #3 on: April 08, 2010, 12:40:58 AM »
If you are looking for a four stroke motor, the Honda 2hp is pretty nice.  I also have a two stroke that I use when I am not on Tahoe.  The shaft of the two stroke is about two inches longer than the one on the Honda.  It does not make much difference unless the water is pretty rough.  The four stroke is much more fuel efficient than the two stroke.

In addition, I store my motor in the aft compartment while sailing.  Something about the six year old sleeping and playing in the cabin...  The aft hatch and compartment may be very tight for a long shaft engine.  Also, the Honda that I have has a twist throttle on the handle.  There is an option to get a slide throttle on the front of the motor cover.  This would make it a lot easier to get the engine in and out of that aft hatch.

When trailering, the engine rides in the car.  Nevada roads are great, but I'm afraid that the engine is going to bust the boat on the California roads.

Phil
#155

Trent Watkins

  • Inactive
  • U20 Virgin
  • *
  • Posts: 13
Re: Short or Long Shaft Outboard?
« Reply #4 on: April 08, 2010, 08:20:22 PM »
2hp 4stroke all the way. I had a really nice heavy rubber/canvas bag for my 1st one till some thieves made of with it. STill trying to find a bag for me new one. Short shaft is fine. I also learned that in worst case you can motor sail the U20 with jib and short shaft 2hp quite well in some bad stuff.

I lash it to the compression post and have never put it in the aft locker. Phil would be a great candidate for a nice engine bag as would most of us but so far it seems no one is making them now.

Mike Josselyn

  • #62 Uhoo
  • Active Member
  • U20 Enthusiast
  • **
  • Posts: 137
Re: Short or Long Shaft Outboard?
« Reply #5 on: April 09, 2010, 04:09:11 AM »
Just because it was available and a good buy, I got a long shaft 2hp Honda.   Great engine and I have found that when coming into shallow water ramps where you may have to take off the rudder, the long shaft engine provides a lot better steerage compared to boats I have been on with the short shaft.   The long shaft does fit in the cabin under the cockpit; but is a bit more difficult to get out...but I've learned to deal with it.

Mike

Rob McLelland

  • Inactive
  • U20 Virgin
  • *
  • Posts: 5
  • #179
Re: Short or Long Shaft Outboard?
« Reply #6 on: April 09, 2010, 04:40:29 PM »
Thanks everyone for the advice.  I searched here and on the Yahoo list and this question hadn't been addressed that I could find.  It will be nice to have this thread here for some other noob to search for in the future.

Yes, Billy, Tohatsu also makes Nissans and most of the small Mercurys.  The only difference is the decal on the cowl.  They're even making some of the not-so-small Mercs now, I see that the new "Mercury" 30 is actually a Tohatsu product.

I'd be interested in a Tohatsu 2-stroke if I could buy one new.  The 2hp, short-shaft Honda weighs 27 lbs, not much worse than a 2-stroke.  Maybe not as "polished" a product as some might expect from Honda, air-cooled, single cylinder so a little bit noisy and vibe-y, no frills, but that makes maintenance easy.  No water pump to service, and for those in salt, no flushing to worry about.  They hold their value well too if you ever feel the need to sell it.  Hunting around for used ones made me realize you do just about as well to buy new and you don't inherit anyone else's problems.

Short-shaft is sure easier to carry, store, move around etc.  I'm glad to hear they work well enough.  I suspect if you ony had one motor and sometimes had to run in a pretty good chop that a long shaft would be better.  But if you were in that situation, you'd probably want more motor.

If one was in a situation where one really had to motor a lot, against wind and/or tide, something more powerful would probably be in order, Suzuki 2.5, or Tohatsu/Nissan/Mercury 3.5.  Those are the lightest weight motors in each of those power ranges.  "Big" sailboat guys use a rule-of-thumb of 2hp per 1000lbs displacement for power, it's easy enough to figure out your weight of boat, crew and gear and come up with a figure if you were in a "power critical" situation.  Also though, I suspect that the U20 outboard bracket would be a limiting factor to adding too much power.  Like most of us, I'm looking for something to get me off the ramp that doesn't weigh a ton and is not a lot of trouble.

Torqeedo would be great, but the prices really need to come down.  It's also hard to refill that battery from a jug!

For those of you looking for motor bags, you might want to check these guys out - http://www.allinflatables.com/shopping/covers/cases.html
I've ordered one but haven't received it yet.  I can post a review when I get it if anyone's interested.
« Last Edit: April 09, 2010, 04:42:04 PM by Rob McLelland »

John Wolfe

  • #180
  • Active Member
  • U20 Youngster
  • **
  • Posts: 26
Re: Short or Long Shaft Outboard?
« Reply #7 on: April 09, 2010, 10:33:16 PM »
I bought my Honda 2 hp motor cover here.  It is a Tough Duck.  Has worked great for the last couple of years.

http://www.toughduckmarine.com/product;cat,5;item,1;Outboard-Motor-Carry-Bags-Tough-Duck-Outboard-Carry-Bag

Trent Watkins

  • Inactive
  • U20 Virgin
  • *
  • Posts: 13
Re: Short or Long Shaft Outboard?
« Reply #8 on: April 09, 2010, 10:44:34 PM »
John your a saint! For the life of me I could not find a simple bag that wasn't $100+ bucks

I'm ordering one thx
Trent

Rob McLelland

  • Inactive
  • U20 Virgin
  • *
  • Posts: 5
  • #179
Re: Short or Long Shaft Outboard?
« Reply #9 on: April 13, 2010, 11:24:11 PM »
ToughDuck bag and AllInflatables bag are one-and-the-same, even the picture they use is the same.  ToughDuck sells for $30 cheaper and then charges $30 shipping, AllInflatables is "free shipping".  So, your choice...  One is from Manitoba, the other BC, so maybe there'd be a slight difference on shipping time depending on where you live.