Author Topic: Electric motor  (Read 5656 times)

Tin Htoo

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Electric motor
« on: March 24, 2011, 04:25:06 PM »
I am considering using an electric motor for trolling. If anyone is using one, could you please share the motor and battery sizes and where the battery is mounted.

Thank you.

Tin

Tom Burden

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Re: Electric motor
« Reply #1 on: March 24, 2011, 04:27:18 PM »
I have used a Torqeedo 801 and Torqeedo 1003 on my U20, over the past four years. They both have integrated batteries that fit on top of the motor. If you’re clear about the limitations of battery life, they are good choices. I recently towed a 505 back to Richmond when the wind died using the 1003 on my U20. I also own a Honda 2hp gas outboard that I have not used since I started using the electric motors.
« Last Edit: March 24, 2011, 04:33:15 PM by Tom Burden »

Tin Htoo

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Re: Electric motor
« Reply #2 on: March 28, 2011, 04:34:53 PM »
The range we need is pretty well defined. However, I would like to have a margin for bad days too. Torqueedo motors seem to be very good quality. But their integrated batteries have a marginal range for us. I am trying to find out how others put together separate batteries and motors. I read around a bit on the web and learned that the battery needs to be in a ventilated place. That kind of gets tricky on a sailboat. So, I am wondering if and how others have done it on a U20.

Tom Burden

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Re: Electric motor
« Reply #3 on: March 31, 2011, 09:31:57 PM »
The amount of ventilation needed varies. Traditional flooded deep cycle batteries emit hydrogen when charging and can spill acid. Gel, AGM or others of the newer type, like Optima, do not need as much special consideration, but they cost a lot more. The cheapest alternative would be a couple of Group 24 lead acid batteries, located in a battery box near the keel, wired in series for 24 volts, connected to a Torqeedo Cruise motor. When you consider that the standard battery on a new 1003 Torqeedo is rated at 18 amp hours, and a couple of Group 24 deep cycle batteries are rated at 65 amp hours, you could go a long way with that setup. Of course, the two batteries would weigh about 80 pounds. These are the trade-offs to consider.


Tin Htoo

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Re: Electric motor
« Reply #4 on: April 03, 2011, 07:54:17 PM »
Thank you for the information, Tom. After reading the specs more closely, The torqueedo 1003 range is not that small either if you don't run it on full throttle. Like you said, I have to weigh points and decide.

Is the short shaft 1003 good for U20 or do I need a long one?

Tom Burden

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Re: Electric motor
« Reply #5 on: April 06, 2011, 02:52:21 AM »
The short shaft works fine in relatively flat water. I have not used it in big waves because there is usually wind, so the boat goes faster under sail. The brand new 1003 model has a bigger battery than the one I use as well. I think it is 500 watt hours instead of 400.

Tom Downing

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Re: Electric motor
« Reply #6 on: April 19, 2011, 08:26:18 PM »
We ran a std MinnKota trolling motor all last season (50 lb thrust).  Have one Group 24 marine battery.  It ran well for all the Wedneday nite races and we only charged it up about once a month.  This off season I have permantly mounted a 3 prong marine plug and installed #4 AWG wiring from the transom to the keel box where the battery is mounted and added a solar panel. 
This is the second trolling motor I have used on sailboats.  Last one pushed my Capri 25.  This setup was considerably less expensive than the Torqeedo.
Tom Downing
U20 # 77
"Velocitize"

Tin Htoo

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Re: Electric motor
« Reply #7 on: June 07, 2011, 04:58:22 PM »
Hi Tom:

What battery capacity are you using and how much does it weigh? Are you able to run it on solar charging alone or do you need to top it up sometimes? What panels are chargers are you using?

Thank you.

Tin